Dawn Wink: Dewdrops

Writing, Teaching, Language, Landscape, Life

Association for the Study of Literature and Environment in dear Davis

14 Comments

The arboretum of UC/Davis. Noe the baby ducklings! Photo ©Brenda Lanphear

They say, “Home is where the heart is.” If this is true (and I believe it is), then my heart beats in more than one place.

I’ve written of my landscapes of the heart on the ranch, in Santa Fe, and Arizona. Another place of pulse that I have not yet written so much about are the nearly 20 years lived in Davis, CA.

I was beyond blessed to return to University of California/Davis for the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment Conference 2019 for a time of idea exploration and reconnection with deep roots.

First, the UC/Davis Campus—the arboretum where I studied, read, and ran for years.

The quad with inevitable bikes in the Bicycle Capital of the US:

I presented with the panel “Beyond Retreat: (Re)thinking Pastoral Landscape in the Posthuman Turn” (Chaired by Stefano Rozzoni, University of Bergamo. Gratitude to my professor, Dr. Jennifer Wells, for connecting me to this organization and Stefano). I presented on “Pastoral Landscape Through an Ecolinguistic Lens.”

Dawn Wink, Rachel L. Carazo, Lisa Robinson, Stefano Rozzoni

My doctoral work focuses on exploring the relationship between language and landscape through the lenses of wildness, beauty, and imagination.

Ecolinguistics and linguistic human rights ground this work.

Ecolinguistics explore the role of language in the life-sustaining interactions of humans, other species, and the physical environment. The first aim is to develop linguistic theories which see humans not only as part of society, but also as part of the larger ecosystems that life depends on. The second aim is to show how linguistics can be used to address key ecological issues, from climate change and biodiversity loss to environmental justice (Skutnabb-Kangas & Harmon, 2018).

Linguistic human rights can be defined as “only those language rights . . . which are so basic for a dignified life that everybody has them because of being human; therefore, in principle no state (or individual) is allowed to violate them” (Skutnabb-Kangas, 2008, p. 109).

It was fascinating to hear the other presentations and how we each approached pastoral landscape through a vast spectrum of understandings and experiences.

At the end of my presentation I posed these thoughts to muse:

          Language as natural element of landscape.

          Language diversity as element of ecological diversity.

          Diverse linguistic landscapes as integral for global sustainability.

When not immersed in all things literature and ecology, it was a time of reconnecting with deep roots and friendships. My final years in Davis were all about babies, babies, and babies—having them, holding them, loving them.

Davis, 1999. Wyatt (3), Luke (1 1/2), Wynn (2 days).

Because of these baby years, when I found myself at the Farmer’s Market in Davis Central Park a newborn (grandson of a deep-roots-bookclub-friend) I felt all of the places where my heart beats slide together.

 

Works Cited

Skutnabb-Kangas, T. (2008). Linguistic genocide in education or worldwide diversity and human rights?” Hyderabad, Telangana: Orient Blackswan.

Skutnabb-Kangas, T. & Harmon, D. (2018). “Biological diversity and language diversity.” In The routledge handbook of       ecolingistics. New York City, NY: Routledge.

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Author: Dawn Wink

Dawn Wink is a writer and educator whose work explores the beauty and tensions of language, culture, and place.

14 thoughts on “Association for the Study of Literature and Environment in dear Davis

  1. Hola Dawn,
    ¡Cómo me hubiera encantado haberte visto! La próxima vez que pases por Davis y tengas un tiempito avísame. Me encantaría saludarte y darte un abrazo.

    Saludos,

    Ana Maria

    • Ana Maria,

      ¡A mi cómo me hubiera encantado verte a ti, también! Yo nada más estaba allí un par de dias. Espero regresar pronto y quedarme más tiempo. En cuando lo alcanzo, yo me pongo en contacto contigo!

      Un abrazo fuerte,
      Dawn

  2. Dawn I am so impressed with you! Please include me when you finish work and receive your doctorate. I love you, Cathy

    • Cathy, I will absolutely share with you. Perhaps we’ll even make some puff paint t-shirts to mark the event! Remember when we did that? Too fun. I love you, too. Dawn

  3. In the synchronistic way that the universe works, this blog post arrived exactly when I needed it to do so. I’m writing a curriculum guide on adaptation and climate change. I’ve been looking for the literary component for 11th graders and WOW!!!! Thank you times a million.

  4. What a wonderful piece! I really enjoyed the way you tied all of the elements together; the holistic way in which what you are studying and reporting on synthesizes with you and who you are. Actually conveys who you are, and how we all could be if we (some of us) weren’t so intent on dominating and projecting ourselves onto others. Your passion for this approach to humanity/linguistics/ecology comes through very clearly. Brava!!

  5. Penny, so wonderful to hear from you and am grateful to know this touched a big part of your heart! Thanks so much for taking the time to connect. Hugs to you across the miles!

  6. Dearest Dawn, I have to say that the photo of you in 1998 is one tough momma bear, looking really hot! Love ya, girlfriend, P

    On Thu, Aug 22, 2019 at 7:32 PM Dawn Wink: Dewdrops wrote:

    > Dawn Wink posted: ” They say, “Home is where the heart is.” If this is > true (and I believe it is), then my heart beats in more than one place. > I’ve written of my landscapes of the heart on the ranch, in Santa Fe, and > Arizona. Another place of pulse that I have not yet” >

  7. “My doctoral work focuses on exploring the relationship between language and landscape through the lenses of wildness, beauty, and imagination.” Dear Dawn, what a fascinating subject. It makes me wonder if languages other than English paint a better picture of landscape. I’m thinking Spanish would and you would know since you speak Espanol beautifully! Congratulations on nearing the end of the PhD work and I’m certain you aced the presentation. Much love and big hugs, Dan

    • Dear Dan, so wonderful to hear from you. I find these ideas fascinating, as well. I love your thoughts on how other languages might express landscape with different insights and understandings. Ecolinguistics and linguistic human rights explores this in powerful ways and I’m doing my best to weave some new ways of exploring these ideas together – including in Spanish! 🙂 Coursework for PhD now complete, so now to just write this dissertation. Much love and big hugs to you, Dawn

  8. How amazing and fruitful the study of ecolinguistics! This touched a big part of my heart. Best wishes on a great learning experience at the conference.

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